Working with Children, Young People and Families top-up award BA (Hons)

Single and Joint Honours, Part-time

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Key Details

  • 2 Years
  • Part Time

Entry Requirements

 

Level 4 or 5 qualification; contact Admissions for the suitability of your qualification(s).

Directions

Course Fees

Course fees 2018/19*

Part-time Home/EU students £9,250* (total course fee)

For students who have completed a Foundation Degree at Newman: £6,750 (part time*).

N.B. As the part-time course is three semesters (dissertation is done the following academic year), the full £6,750 is paid in year 1, then no fees are paid in the following year

* Please note for 2019/20 the University reserves the right to increase fees broadly in line with increases in inflation, or to reflect changes in government funding policies or changes agreed by Parliament.

Modules

As a part time student, the amount of credits you complete each year may vary. Credits are made up of mandatory modules and you may have a list of optional modules to choose from. Not every programme offers optional modules and when an optional module is available it will be clearly marked. All modules are listed below and you may not be required to complete all of these modules. Most modules are 20 credits and dissertations are 40 credits. Please note that not all optional modules run every year. For further information please email registry@newman.ac.uk.

1-2 years part-time

  1. SAFEGUARDING, VIOLENCE AND HARM IN POLICY AND PRACTICE
    (Compulsory) wwu611
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    MODULE SUMMARY :

    This module will provide students with the opportunity to explore historical and contemporary concerns that have served to shape policy and practice. Students will explore current legislation and its implications for practice for all those working with the young and families exposed to violence and harm. Consideration will be given to the impact that abuse and harm can have on the lives of victims and their families. A clearer understanding will be gained of the different roles and responsibilities of those working in these areas.

    CONTACT HOURS :

    Scheduled : 54.00 Independent : 246.00 Placement : 0.00 Total :  300.00

    MODULE CURRICULUM LED OUTCOMES :

    This module aims to: 

    • Give students an understanding of the different forms of abuse, neglect and harm that some children and adults experience in their day-to-day lives.
    • Develop students’ ability to demonstrate how and why the policy and practice focus of these areas have changed over time.
    • Critically evaluate how current legislation is likely to impact on safeguarding children and adults exposed to violence and harm.
    • Explore the different roles and responsibilities that professionals undertake in working with victims and perpetrators and of the tensions and contradictions which can arise from this.

    LEARNING OPPORTUNITIES :

    Students will, by the end of the module, have the opportunity to: 

    • Critique policy and practice examples balancing the needs of adults and children and between protection, rights and self-efficacy.
    • Outline and critically analyse the content and intentions of relevant key legislation and guidance.
    • Understand the forms that abuse and harm can take and their implications for victims, perpetrators and practitioners.
    • Critically investigate and debate key issues facing practitioners working in these areas.
    • Discuss and challenge misconceptions and stereotypes in this area with reference to literature and policy.
    • Demonstrate a critical understanding of wider cultural issues relating to harm and violence including perspectives from outside the UK.

    METHOD OF ASSESSMENT :

    Component 1 - 40% Group Presentation (20 minutes, plus 5 minutes of questions)

    Component 2 - 60% Essay (3000 words)

  2. UNDERSTANDING INEQUALITIES
    (Compulsory) wwu612
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    MODULE SUMMARY :

    This module builds on a series of inequalities modules in the WWCYPF Programme (e.g. WWU401, WWU503, WWU508).  The module will begin to explore the social history of a range of movements (for example the Labour Movement; the Women’s Movement; the Disability Movement; the Civil Rights Movement; the Gay Rights Movement, etc.) that have challenged inequalities and issues of social justice.  The module will also analyse why and how the movements came into existence, and critically reflect on how successful they were/are and what has been learned about overcoming inequalities. 

    This module will also developing critical understandings of concepts of advocacy and representation in different contexts. Central to the module is an exploration of how advocacy can have a role in challenging oppression, with particular emphasis on understanding issues of voice, human rights and representation for marginalised groups.  Applied advocacy, in its different forms, will be critically analysed drawing out issues related to power and with some emphasis on the potential for children, young people and communities becoming their own advocate.

    CONTACT HOURS :

    Scheduled : 36.00 Independent : 164.00 Placement : 0.00 Total :  200.00

    MODULE CURRICULUM LED OUTCOMES :

    This module aims to: 

    • Explore issues of inequalities through the lens of social history.
    • Examine the ideological, philosophical and social constructs that lead to inequalities.
    • Critically explore the social history of a range of movements that have challenged issues of inequality.
    • Critically reflect on why these movements were/are needed and consider how successful they have been in tackling inequalities.
    • Analyse what we have learned about overcoming inequalities, through examining the stories and experiences of these movements.
    • Critically reflect on the underpinning definitions, and associated values and principles, of advocacy and representation
    • Critically reflect on the need for advocacy in challenging oppression, with particular emphasis on understanding issues of voice, human rights and representation for marginalised groups.

    LEARNING OPPORTUNITIES :

    Students will, by the end of the module, have the opportunity to: 

    • Research the social history and roles of collective movements in attempting to address inequalities.
    • Critically evaluate what impact social movements have had on issues of inequality and social justice.
    • Critically reflect on what has been learned, from these movements, about approaches to overcoming inequalities and issues of social justice.
    • Identify some of the key models of advocacy and associated benefits, tensions and complexities
    • Demonstrate a critical understanding of the role of personal, professional and institutional values in supporting advocacy and representation in different contexts.

    METHOD OF ASSESSMENT :

    Component 1 - 70% Booklet (4000 word equivalent)

    Component 2 - 30% Group Presentation (15 minutes)